Start of Peer Mentoring Sign up

For all mentors of the WiMIR mentoring round 2019, we offer Peer Mentoring. In this blog post we would like to familiarize you with the Peer Mentoring sign-up procedure. This year we use Trello (explanations follow below), please note that the sign-up deadline is March 10th.

What is peer mentoring?

Peer mentoring provides mentors with the opportunity to discuss various career aspects with other mentors in the WiMIR program. Peer mentoring is meant to serve as a complement to the traditional mentoring program, in which mentor and mentee in any given pair typically have an unequal amount of experience in the field of MIR. In the case of peer mentoring, the two peers may have comparable amounts of experience, yet benefit from each other by bringing in various perspectives on MIR. For example, these perspectives may differ in terms of scholarly background, geographical affiliation, working environment, MIR subfield of expertise, experience with teaching and public outreach, technical skill set, mentoring practices, and more.

Our hope is that the peer mentoring program will contribute to reinforcing the cohesion of the MIR community at large, and in particular: across countries and continents, across scientific disciplines, and between academia and industry. Furthermore, we aim to frame this program within the core mission of WiMIR, that is, to increase the opportunities of women in the field of MIR. Therefore, we encourage WiMIR mentors of all genders to take part in the peer mentoring program, and adopt this communication channel as a facilitator of diversity and inclusion.

How does peer mentoring work?

The first stage of the peer mentoring program is for you to introduce yourself to the rest of the WiMIR mentors. The second stage is to read the profiles of other participants, rank them by order of preference, and send us the ranked list of your top choices. The third stage, once you are assigned a peer, is for you to connect with them through private electronic communication.

Why use Trello?

Last year, the interface for introducing oneself to other peer mentors, and selecting a peer, was a simple shared spreadsheet on Google Documents. This year, because of the rising number of participants, we have decided to migrate to another interface: Trello. This might seem like an iconoclastic choice given that, for those of you who already know Trello, it is primarily designed to be a tool for task management rather than team building. Yet, as it turns out, the streamlined drag-and-drop interface of a Trello board is actually perfect for us to collect the ranked list of preferences of each participant.

A Trello board consists of items (“cards”) which can be moved from one column (“list”) to another. In project management, cards are tasks and lists are states of completion. However, in our peer mentoring interface, we will be using cards to denote participants, and lists to denote preference. For the time being, there is a single Trello board, and it is only visible to us organizers. We kindly ask participants to fill in this Trello board via an email interface.

In an upcoming stage, we will duplicate this Trello board and send a different, private copy to every one of you. At that point, your role will be to browse through the Trello cards of other participants and rank the ones you want to meet.

How do I introduce myself to other mentors?

You can introduce yourself by creating your Trello card. Rather than giving global access to the entire Trello board, we propose that you use the email-to-board interface of Trello. This interface is lighter, more portable, and more accessible to people with disabilities than the visual interface.

Here is a link describing the email-to-board interface of Trello: https://help.trello.com/article/809-creating-cards-by-email

We particularly point your attention towards the “formatting tips” paragraph.

The subject of the email you will send will become the title of the Trello card.

For consistency, we ask everyone to title their Trello card with three elements, separated by spaces:

  1. The two-letter abbreviation of the country of affiliation
  2. Your full name.
  3. Some hashtags describing your own interests in MIR.

For example:

  • “US Vincent Lostanlen #academia #symbolic #timbre”
  • “NL Vincent Koops #academia #harmony #rhythm”
  • “US Blair Kaneshiro #industry #cognition #performance”
  • etc.

The list of recommended hashtags includes, but is not limited to:

  • #academia
  • #accessibility
  • #behavior
  • #business
  • #careers
  • #cognition
  • #corpora
  • #creation
  • #dance
  • #diversity
  • #ethics
  • #health
  • #indexing
  • #industry
  • #melody
  • #metadata
  • #methodologies
  • #performance
  • #recommendation
  • #rhythm
  • #semantic
  • #structure
  • #symbolic
  • #style
  • #teaching
  • #transcription
  • #timbre
  • #voice

You may include other hashtags in the email subject as you see fit. We highly recommend using the #academia and #industry hashtags, and at least two others in the list.

What to put on my Trello card?

In the email body, we ask mentors to include a small profile to their card that includes some biographical information, research interests, and reasons for wanting to participate in peer mentoring. A recommended outline is

  • Some biographical information
  • Current position(s)
  • Research interests and goals
  • Current research focus
  • Interests and pursuits outside of research
  • Projects you are currently working on
  • Your goals in peer mentoring 

As an example, below is the information on the card of Vincent Lostanlen.

– He/him. 26 years old
– a postdoc at NYU’s Music and Audio Research Lab
– visiting scholar from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, working on bioacoustics
– research goal: MIR applications at the interaction between signal processing and deep learning
– current focus: contemporary music techniques, timbral and structural similarity
– outside of research: computer music designer for Florian Hecker
– open source: Kymatio, librosa, scattering.m

In addition to scientific topics, I would like to progress in my understanding of diversity and inclusion in MIR, ethical responsibility, and fostering links between research and creation.

I would prefer to establish contacts with peers in France or the UK.

Background: EngD Télécom Paristech 2013, MSc Ircam 2013, PhD applied math ENS 2017.

You can also write in prose if you prefer. Feel free to add as many details about yourself as you want.

What is the email address I should write to?

wimirpeermentors+ardgsv5nleozfdsnxnbx@boards.trello.com

Again, please make sure that the subject of the email contains your country of affiliation, your full name, and some hashtags of interest.

Deadline: Please make sure you email your Trello card by March 10th.

What if I want to connect with multiple mentors at once?

Although the peer mentoring program is designed to focus on one-to-one communication, we wish to point out that there is also a recommended communication channel for broadcasting messages to all mentors of the WiMIR program. This communication channel is the channel #wimir_mentors_ on the “MIR community” Slack workspace. Below is the link:

https://mircommunity.slack.com/messages/C9NJJ5R7B

Please note, however, that Slack restricts the history of this workspace to the most recent 10,000 messages. Thus, even though this channel is OK for short-lived announcements, it is not ideal for keeping track of the evolution of long-term projects.

Who are the Peer Mentoring Coordinators?

The Peer Mentoring Coordinators will help you find a suitable peer mentor: Hendrik Vincent Koops (Utrecht University) and Vincent Lostanlen (New York University). If you have questions, please contact them at the following email addresses: h.v.koops@gmail.com and vincent.lostanlen@nyu.edu

TL;DR if you are a WiMIR mentor in the 2019 round and want to join the peer mentoring program, please write an email to wimirpeermentors+ardgsv5nleozfdsnxnbx@boards.trello.com

with an email subject of the form “US Vincent Lostanlen #academia #symbolic #timbre” and personal information about yourself in the email body.

With our best wishes,

The Peer Mentoring Coordinators

Hendrik Vincent Koops and Vincent Lostanlen

WiMIR mentoring round 2019 kickoff

The fourth round of the WiMIR mentoring program is about to start,  mentors and mentees have been matched and introduced  to each other by the Mentoring Program Committee.  Participants come from Europe, North and South America,  Oceania and for the first time from Africa. Thanks everyone for contributing and keeping your commitment! Happy mentoring!

WiMIR mentoring 2019 participants

Mentoring Program Committee

  • Johanna Devaney, Brooklyn College, US
  • Ryan Groves, Melodrive, Germany
  • Blair Kaneshiro, Stanford University, US
  • Anja Volk, Utrecht University, the Netherlands

Peer Mentoring Coordinators

  • Hendrik Vincent Koops, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
  • Vincent Lostanlen, New York University, US

Our mentees reside in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Taiwan, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States. They represent a diverse field of interests and backgrounds, such as artificial intelligence, signal processing, natural language processing, musicology, applied mathematics, computer science, audio signal processing, psychoacoustics, human computer interactive performance, computational musicology, music perception and cognition, data science, complex system, acoustics, physics, machine learning, software engineering, ethnomusicology, composition, music therapy, neuroscience, and psychology.

We thank our generous mentors from Europe, North and South America, Asia and Oceania for dedicating their time to this program:

Kat Agres, IHPC (A*STAR), Singapore
Steinunn Arnardottir, Native Instruments GmbH, Germany
Thomas Arvanitidis, MUSIC Tribe, United Kingdom
Andreas Arzt, Johannes Kepler University, Austria
Ana M. Barbancho, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
Isabel Barbancho, Universidad de Malaga, Spain
Dogac Basaran, IRCAM, France
Christine Bauer, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
Amy Beeston, University of Leeds, UK (Scotland)
Brian Bemman, Aalborg University, Denmark
Francesco Bigoni, Aalborg University – Copenhagen, Denmark
Rachel Bittner, Spotify, United States
Tom Butcher, Microsoft, USA
Marcelo Caetano, Freelance, Argentina
Mark Cartwright, Apple, UK
Doga Cavdir, CCRMA, Stanford University, United States
JOe Cheri Ross, Linkedin, India
Srikanth Cherla, Jukedeck, Sweden
Orchisama Das, Stanford University (CCRMA), United States
Matthew Davies, INESC TEC, Portugal
Andrew Demetriou, TU Delft, Netherlands
Chris Donahue, UC San Diego, US
Jonathan Driedger, Chordify, Germany/The Netherlands
Andrew Elmsley, Melodrive, Germany
Philippe Esling, IRCAM – Sorbonnes Universités, France
Sebastian Ewert, Waikato University, New Zealand
Ichiro Fujinaga, McGill University, Canada
Fabien Gouyon, Pandora, UK/Portugal
Ryan Groves, Melodrive Inc., Germany
Blair Kaneshiro, Stanford University, USA
Thor Kell, Spotify, United States
Peter Knees, TU Wien, Austria
Hendrik Vincent Koops, Utrecht University, Netherlands
Katerina Kosta, Jukedeck, United Kingdom
Nadine Kroher, MXX Music, Spain
Robin Laney, Open University, UK
Audrey Laplante, Université de Montréal, Canada
Alexander Lerch, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Mark Levy, New York University, United States
Michael Mandel, Brooklyn College, CUNY, USA
Ethan Manilow, Northwestern University, USA
Matthew McCallum, Gracenote, United States
Brian McFee, New York University, United States
Blai Meléndez-Catalán, UPF / BMAT, Spain
Gabriel Meseguer Brocal, Ircam, France
Meinard Mueller, International Audio Laboratories Erlangen, Germany
Néstor Nápoles López, McGill University, Canada
Eric Nichols, Microsoft, USA
Oriol Nieto, Pandora, USA
Sergio Oramas, Spotify, United Kingdom
Ritu Patil, Cummins college of engineering, India
Johan Pauwels, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
Marcelo Queiroz, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Elio Quinton, Universal Music Group, United Kingdom
Colin Raffel, Google Brain, USA
Preeti Rao, IIT Bombay, India
Christopher Raphael, Indiana Univ., USA
Justin Salamon, New York University, USA
Andy Sarroff, iZotope, USA
Bertrand Scherrer, LANDR AUDIO INC., Canada
Sertan Şentürk, Pandora, Spain
Amina Shabbeer, Amazon, United States
Ajeet Singh, India
Joren Six, IPEM, Ghent University, Belgium
Jordan Smith, United Kingdom
Mohamed Sordo, Pandora, United States
Ajay Srinivasamurthy, Amazon Alexa, India, India
Bob Sturm, KTH, Sweden
Derek Tingle, IDAGIO, Germany
Christopher Tralie, Duke University, United States
Marcelo Tuller, INESC TEC, Portugal
Doug Turnbull, Ithaca College, United States
Makarand Velankar, MKSSS’S Cummins College of Engineering, Pune, India
Gissel Velarde, Moodagent, Denmark
Christof Weiss, International Audio Laboratories Erlangen, Germany
Chih-Wei Wu, Netflix, Inc., U.S.
Gus Xia, NYU Shanghai, USA/China

Sign-ups open for WiMIR mentoring round 2019

For preparing the fourth round of the Women in Music Information Retrieval (WiMIR) mentoring program, to begin in January 2019,  we kindly invite previous and new mentors and mentees to sign up  through the following signup forms:

Sign up to GET a mentor in 2019 here: http://bit.ly/2Ns8ulj

Sign up to BE a mentor in 2019 here: http://bit.ly/2Da6ZTZ

Signups close Nov 30, 2018. Mentor/mentee matches will be announced in January 2019.

The WiMIR mentoring program connects women students, postdocs, early-stage researchers, industry employees, and faculty to more senior women and men in MIR who are dedicated to increasing opportunities for women in the field. Mentors will share their experiences and offer guidance to support mentees in achieving and exceeding their goals and aspirations. The program offers to all mentors the option to pair up with a peer mentor for discussing relevant topics with a professional at a similar stage of their career.  By connecting individuals of different backgrounds and expertise, this program strengthens networks within the MIR community, both in academia and industry. 

Time commitment: four remote meetings between January and end of June 2019.

Who is eligible?

– Female undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, early-stage researchers, industry employees, and faculty may sign up as mentees. 

– Graduate students, industry employees, researchers, and faculty of any gender may sign up as mentors. 

– Those meeting criteria for both mentor and mentee roles are welcome to sign up as both. 

Faculty: Please share this announcement with female undergraduates in your departments and labs who may be interested in participating. The mentoring program can help attracting newcomers at an early stage to the MIR field.

More information on the program

General information: https://wimir.wordpress.com/mentoring-program/ 

Report on the mentoring round in 2017:  http://bit.ly/2yuWS5i

Report on the mentoring round in 2018:  https://bit.ly/2P5pBG3

Questions? Email wimir-mentoring@ismir.net 

We look forward to your response and commitment to continuing the mentoring program!

The WiMIR Mentoring Program Committee

Johanna Devaney, Ryan Groves, Blair Kaneshiro, and Anja Volk

WiMIR Mentoring Program Report 2018: On the “only meeting that should last longer”

wimir_poster_website_jpg

Poster design: Julia Wilkins

Blog post by Anja Volk (Utrecht University), Co-Founder of the WiMIR Mentoring Program

“This is the only hour-long meeting on my calendar that I secretly wish would last longer.” Let’s take this quote from a mentor’s anonymous feedback on his/her experience with the WiMIR mentoring program as the opening fanfare to our report on the outcomes of the 2018 mentoring round as reflected by the participants. I can hardly think of any bigger compliment to this program from the perspective of a busy mentor. Before looking into what other mentors and mentees told us in their anonymous feedback about their experience with the program, allow me some remarks on reports in the field of Music Information Retrieval.

We love big numbers in Music Information Retrieval – we are fans of analyzing millions of musical pieces and reporting statistics. Accordingly, our report on the WiMIR mentoring round in 2018 might deal with a lot of numbers, such as the fact that the number of participants has doubled again as in previous years, with 80 mentor-mentee pairs enrolling this time, while participants came from Europe, North and South America, Asia and Oceania. Or we might count how the list of academic institutions participating has only grown since the first round in 2016, with about 70 institutions participating in 2018,  and that we have meanwhile mentors from most of the leading music technology companies and even AI and music startups, adding up to about 40 companies. You can check that out here.

However, let’s take in this report the musicologist’s approach of giving great care to details, analyzing one piece after the other (and not necessarily millions at once) and let’s listen to one piece at a time, or better to one story at a time on how the mentees felt empowered, gained career perspectives, came to appreciate the MIR community and felt encouraged and included through the mentoring sessions. These individual stories might give a more detailed picture on what has been gained than plain numbers.

For a description of the general format of the WiMIR mentoring program, with 4 remote meetings between mentor and mentee, you can check out last year’s report here

Exposition first theme

Outcomes from mentoring sessions on career perspectives as reported by mentees

The following anonymous quotes provide an overview of how mentees were able to gain clarities and perspectives on their career options in MIR.

Not only has the WiMIR mentoring programme opened up opportunities for me to study it and work abroad, experiencing other universities, it has built my confidence with networking with more senior academics.

I already told this to anyone I met working in wide ranged related fields. This is the best way to find your path to learn or make career goals.

With his guidance, I found my path through my best interests in both academic and industrial ways.

I have more clarity on my career path.

Discussing with a successful woman in this field was very interesting so that I could ask specific questions about my work/life path that would help me making decisions for my future career.

It deepened my understanding on research from the perspective of a big picture.

The program provides an important channel for research and career information exchange, which means a lot for early-stage researchers.

Sign up for the WiMIR mentoring programme because TRUST ME you will NOT regret it. It’s the best thing I have done for my future within my PhD.

Exposition second theme

Specific outcomes from mentoring sessions on career perspectives as reported by mentees

Quite a range of different projects have emerged from the mentoring sessions this year, from landing a job to programming skills, writing CVs, papers or research proposals, or getting an internship. Here are some examples.

I got a new job in the industry that relates to music! My mentor helped with all of the positive support and encouragement!

So, thanks to my mentor, I applied to the WiMIR Grant Application at the ISMIR Conference 2018.

I was able to land a job that combines music and computer science and I’m really excited to be making a difference in the music world from a variety of areas!

I received valuable feedback on my job materials such as my CV and a cover letter.

I learnt handy programming tricks.

I wrote and submitted a fellowship application (which got through to the final shortlist for the award).

I’ve learnt how to define and narrow a research problem and how to solve it step by step.

We could come up with a collaborative work on which we are currently working.

I presented a paper that I was working on for feedback to students/ faculty at University X.

I finally created a personal website.

Received help with a conference proposal and acceptance for conference.

Time saving! Great to have someone to help make yes/no decisions about whether opportunities are worth chasing or not.

Received help shaping my dissertation topic.

Started collaborating for a new paper.

Development

Encouragement, encouragement, encouragement

An underlying topic that recurs over the editions of the mentoring program since 2016 is that of encouragement for mentees. Why is that so important? The psychiatrist Anna Fels has shown that ambition is built on two components: 1) mastering a skill, and 2) being recognized for it. Fels has demonstrated that being recognized by others for their skills happens to a much smaller extent for girls and women than for boys and men: “The personal and societal recognition they receive for their accomplishments is quantitatively poorer, qualitatively more ambivalent, and, perhaps most discouraging, less predictable.” Unfortunately, this starts already early for girls at schools: “Despite the fact that girls’ and women’s achievements, particularly in the academic sphere, frequently outstrip those of their male peers, they routinely underestimate their abilities. Boys and men, by contrast, have repeatedly been shown to have an inflated estimation of their capabilities. Paradoxically, these inaccurate self-ratings by both women and men seem to be accurate reflections of the praise and recognition they receive for their efforts. The impact of these findings on the selection and pursuit of an ambition is obvious: If you don’t think the chances are great that you will reach a career goal, you won’t attempt to reach it—even if the rewards are highly desirable.” (quotes from Anna Fels’ Harvard Business Review “Do Women Lack Ambition?”) More and more empirical studies reveal the different contexts in which women receive less recognition for the same skills as their male peers, such as the study by Moss-Racusin et al. (2012) which has shown that both male and female faculty rated male applicants as significantly more competent than women with identical application materials, and a study by Reuben et al. (2014) showing that both men and women were twice as likely to hire a man for a job that required math than a woman for that same job, even though the women performed equally well in an arithmetic test. Seeing, recognizing and rewarding the skills and talents of women seems to be an important ingredient to learn for all of us.

The WiMIR mentors pay an invaluable contribution toward encouraging mentees to follow their ambitions by doing exactly this: Seeing and recognizing their talents, showing possible career paths,  giving positive feedback on the mentees’ talents, and coming up with concrete steps such as those we have listed above in the exposition. At the same time, mentoring is a great way to discover female talent, and hence a big gain for the MIR community in getting to know these talented women and keep them hopefully involved in the field. Here are some mentees’ reflections on the encouragement this produces:

I have had one of the well-known, experienced MIR researchers all for myself – to talk about myself and help me set goals and develop a vision – what a luxury! I have emerged after my PhD without any understanding what I should do and where the field is going. I felt frustrated and disorientated and the positive, supportive attitude of my mentor was reassuring. Since then I have been on a journey of self-discovery and motivation and I am sure my mentor would be able to help me on several stages of this journey.

… helpful to talk to someone who has followed a career path that is similar to the one I plan to follow, and about which I had many doubts and fears.

I gained a mentor who has empowered me immensely.

I believe that the most important gain from the program was more confidence to work with MIR.

Now I could imagine myself researching interesting and relevant topics and going further in the academic carrier.

I became more optimistic as a Ph.D. student and have new insights to look at my research. The encouragements from my mentor mean a lot to me.

It encouraged me to try to stay in our field.

I felt empowered to ask questions openly and honestly, and felt like my mentor wanted to participate in our conversations just as much as I did. I felt valued and heard during our meetings.

It has opened so many doors for me, and built my confidence in networking in a competitive community.

The WiMIR mentoring has empowered myself.

Women in STEM are often unsure if it is okay to simultaneously feel assertive and vulnerable.  I was given the opportunity to ask questions and provide my own thoughts about STEM, MIR and other topics in a way that felt heard, respected and valued.  I got to practice asking questions in an open and trusting manner, which ultimately led me to understand that honesty, transparency and assertiveness (even in asserting that you are very confused and unsure about something) actually provide a platform for empowerment, respect and growth.

The programme shows you that you are not alone in MIR and STEM. Women are a minority, and this programme brings us together, it inspires and develops us as individuals and as a whole group. I feel that the programme brings confidence to new and aspiring researchers in the field, showing how we can get to the places we wish to reach.

Recapitulation first theme

Beyond the individual – effects of the program on the MIR community

One-on-one meetings in the mentoring program produce ripples beyond the individuals; they contribute to how the MIR community is perceived as a whole, as the following examples show:

I realized that the MIR community is wide, respectful and open to new members, even if they come from related but slightly different research domains.

If I had not applied for the WiMIR Mentoring Program, I probably wouldn’t know the amazing things that could be made from Music. This is the first place that I recommend to start learning and networking in the Music and Technology field.

MIR is a new field for me, but because WiMIR is here, I didn’t have to be scared to be a minority in a STEM field and MIR.

This is an important project to encourage new researchers to be in contact with important professionals and to develop new ideas. For women it is an opportunity to be visible and make more relevant works. I am very grateful for the excellent work of you organizers and I hope to meet you all at ISMIR 2018! =)

I’m really grateful to be attached to the community in this way even though I cannot yet make it to meetings in person. Thank you!

Because it was so easy to discuss things with my mentor, I found it easier to ask a question to other senior members of the MIR community.

Women have so many great ideas, and they bring different methods, perspectives and communication strategies to the table.  The more the women understand they are welcome and needed in MIR, the more they will stick around and be willing to dig deep.

If you don’t want to get lost in many keywords, this program will make you find your learning/career path.

Got to learn a lot from my mentor who is already established in this field. I also got referred to other people and got their feedback and guidance too.

Recapitulation second theme

The gain for mentors

The mentoring program is not only a gain for mentees; perhaps equally important are the gains for mentors. Here are some examples.

It’s really nice to interact with someone who is earlier in her career, and still has very many options to choose from and is also excited about them all. It’s easy to get lost in the day-to-day and forget why I’m doing what I do.

It made me be self-reflective in good ways.

Learning more about academic career paths in different cultures.

I wasn’t expecting to learn so much about recruiters, and the wide variety and competition of the job market.

The issues that women face are fundamentally different, even when they involve exactly the same scenario, just because of the way women are perceived in the workplace. I find that sometimes the approaches I might take as a man simply wouldn’t work for a woman, and it reveals that there is some underlying imbalance there.

It definitely makes me more aware of the gender imbalances and helps me refocus on efforts working with female students at my own institution.

The program helps me in reflecting my one role as an academic advisor.

I realised that all the prejudices that I need to deal with as a musicologist working with engineers are very similar to those an engineer had to face when working with musicologists.

Learned more on research cultures in other labs.

It was great to exchange ideas, links to reading material and perspectives. Hearing how people work in other companies and in academia was very interesting. Both my experience as a mentor and being involved in peer-mentoring were extremely eye opening.

… also learnt a lot about the challenges of raising a family and balancing that with work aspirations.

… learnt more about US universities, her industry experiences.

… a different perspective; insight into a different MIR subfield.

… a window into a different university system (in the USA).

I learned how to share industry experience with grads students.

… learning how to approach people who communicate differently.

I learned more about the obstacles of especially young females. We talked a lot about the many inappropriate statements by male colleagues and other people outside the work context.

It’s unfortunately common for women to encounter hostility and bias. Being a mentor can help balance the experience by demonstrating that not everyone has a negative attitude.

Intermezzo

Future directions

Participants in the mentoring program came up with suggestions for further directions of the WiMIR initiative in their feedback forms, such as asking everyone to take the Harvard implicit associations test, asking industry sponsors to highlight their career paths for future female employees, having women-focused industry job fairs or network development, creating  videos about WiMIR, such as testimonial videos about the WiMIR Mentoring program and upload them on YouTube so many women can watch and learn about it and having more local meetups of mentees and mentors. We will discuss these ideas during the WiMIR session at ISMIR 2018 – and will need help realizing them!

Coda with closing fanfare

Fun for everybody involved in the program receiving praise in the feedback forms. Thanks everybody!

Running the mentoring program requires the dedication and time of the mentoring program committee, the mentors and the mentees. For most people, this is time spent on top of many other agenda points in a busy week. We hope the following quotes show to everybody how impactfully and meaningfully this time was spent, which brings us full circle to the opening fanfare of this report on the one hour-meeting that should have lasted longer.  

That was excellent. I will never forget this experience.

It was an excellent experience.

WiMIR Mentoring Program is So Awesome!

Awesome program!!

Just to say that I really enjoyed it, and I think it’s a fantastic initiative.

It was a good experience!

This is a great initiative, keep up the good work.

Love it. Thanks for making a cool program!

I would really like to thank WiMIR organizers for all the great work resulting in significant change in the field.

This mentorship program is one of the most effective ways to diversify the field of MIR, I hope this goes on for many years to come!

Thanks to the WiMIR team for the great concept and organizing this very impactful initiative.


Anja Volk (Utrecht University), holds master degrees in both mathematics and musicology, and a PhD in the field of computational musicology. The results of her research have substantially contributed to areas such as music information retrieval, computational musicology,  music cognition, and mathematical music theory.  In 2016 she launched together with Amélie Anglade, Emilia Gómez and Blair Kaneshiro the Women in MIR (WIMIR) Mentoring Program.  She co-organized the launch of the Transactions of the International Society for Music Information Retrieval, the open access journal of the ISMIR society, and is serving as Editor-in-Chief for the journal’s first term. Anja received the Westerdijk Award 2018 from Utrecht University in recognition of her efforts on increasing diversity.

WiMIR 1st Annual Workshop

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WiMIR 1st Annual Workshop

WiMIR is excited to partner with Spotify to offer the first-ever WiMIR Workshop, taking place on Friday, 28 September 2018 at Télécom ParisTech in Paris, France. This event is open to all members of the MIR community.

The goal of this event is to provide a venue for mentorship, networking, and collaboration among women and allies in the ISMIR community, while also highlighting technical work by women in MIR in different stages of completion. This is the first time we’ve organized such an event, and we’d love to see you there!

 

An ISMIR Satellite Event

The workshop will take place following the ISMIR2018, featuring a WiMIR reception and the Late-breaking & Demos session. This satellite event aims to complement the conference in three notable ways:

  • Further amplify the scientific efforts of women in the field.
  • Encourage the discussion of proposed or unfinished work.
  • Create additional space for networking.

 

Opportunities for Research, Networking, and Mentorship

The WiMIR Workshop will combine a variety of activities, including a poster session (see below), networking lunch, and small-group ideation and prototyping sessions under the mentorship of senior members of the WiMIR community. From the poster session to the group activities, the event will emphasize early research ideas that can be shaped and developed through discussions that occur throughout the day!

Who Can Participate?

The WiMIR Workshop is open for everyone to attend, and is free! You do not need to attend ISMIR to attend the WiMIR workshop.

Researchers who self-identify as women are invited to submit short abstracts for poster presentations on projects at any stage of completion, from proposal to previously published work. Preliminary and early results are especially encouraged so that presenters can get feedback from peers and mentors. Any topic broadly related to the field of MIR is welcome and encouraged. Click here to submit a poster. Poster submissions close on August 15, 2018, and acceptance notifications will be sent by August 31, 2018.

Please don’t hesitate to send questions to wimir.workshop@gmail.com.

Schedule

0930

1000

Registration/coffee

1000

1015

Opening Remarks

1015

1100

Mentoring Session I (intros and big picture)

1100

1200

Poster Session

1200

1300

Lunch/theme breakout

1300

1600

Mentoring Session II (deep dive into the topic)

1600

1700

Group Presentations

1700

1715

Closing remarks

We look forward to seeing you at the Women in Music Information Retrieval 1st Annual Workshop!

The WiMIR Workshop Organizers


Abstract submission form here: https://goo.gl/forms/hy3ygYnKKS9fTLa13

Mentoring round 2018 is about to start!

After matching nearly 80 mentees and mentors, we are ready to start the mentoring round 2018! We started the mentoring program in 2016 with 40 participants in total; in this third round we welcome more than 150 participants. Thanks everyone for contributing and keeping your commitment! Happy mentoring!

WiMIR mentoring 2018 participants

Mentoring Program Committee

  • Emilia Gómez, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
  • Ryan Groves, Melodrive, Germany
  • Blair Kaneshiro, Stanford University, US
  • Anja Volk, Utrecht University, the Netherlands

Our mentees reside in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Singapore, Switzerland, Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom and USA. They range from high school student to university faculty members and industry employees, and represent a diverse field of interests and backgrounds, such as signal processing, machine learning, computer science, information technology, ethnomusicology, computational musicology, music theory, music composition, music perception and cognition, music performance, music and mathematics, neuroscience, library science, music education, multimedia research, sound design, data analytics.

We thank our generous mentors for dedicating their time to this program:

  • Kat Agres, Institute of High Performance Computing (IHPC), A*STAR, Singapore
  • Steinunn Arnardottir, Native Instruments, Germany
  • Andreas Arzt, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
  • Jeanne Bamberger, UC Berkeley, USA
  • Ana M. Barbancho, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
  • Isabel Barbancho, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
  • Christine Bauer, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
  • Juan Pablo Bello, New York University, USA
  • Brian Bemman, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • Tom Butcher, Microsoft, USA
  • Doga Buse Cavdir, CCRMA, Stanford University, USA
  • Oscar Celma, Pandora, USA
  • Joe Cheri Ross, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India
  • Srikanth Cherla, Jukedeck Ltd., UK
  • Elaine Chew, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  • Tom Collins, Lehigh University, USA
  • Julie Cumming, McGill, Canada
  • Sally Jo Cunningham, Waikato University, New Zealand
  • Matthew Davies, INESC TEC, Portugal
  • Andrew Demetriou, TU-Delft, Netherlands
  • Chris Donahue, University of California, San Diego, USA
  • Georgi Dzhambazov, Voice Magix, Spain
  • Douglas Eck, Google, USA
  • Dan Ellis, Google, USA
  • Mary Farbood, New York University, USA
  • George Fazekas, QMUL, UK
  • Ichiro Fujinaga, McGill University, Canada
  • Nick Gang, Shazam, USA
  • Emilia Gómez, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
  • Fabien Gouyon, Pandora, USA
  • Ryan Groves, Melodrive Inc., Germany
  • Luciana Hamond, UDESC, Brazil
  • Kate Helsen, The University of Western Ontario, Canada
  • Dorien Herremans, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore
  • Eric Humphrey, Spotify, USA
  • Thor Kell, Spotify, USA
  • Anssi Klapuri, Yousician, Finland
  • Peter Knees, TU Wien, Austria
  • Robin Laney, Open University, UK
  • Audrey Laplante, Université de Montréal, Canada
  • Alexander Lerch, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
  • David Lewis, University of Oxford, UK
  • Cynthia Liem, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Matthias Mauch, Queen Mary University of London, UK
  • Brian McFee, New York University, USA
  • Matt McVicar, Jukedeck, UK
  • Emilio Molina, BMAT, Spain
  • Meinard Mueller, International Audio Laboratories Erlangen, Germany
  • John Neuharth, Microsoft, USA
  • Oriol Nieto, Pandora, USA
  • Dimitri Papageorgiou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
  • Emilia Parada-Cabaleiro, University of Augsburg, Germany
  • Geoffroy Peeters, IRCAM, France
  • Aggelos Pikrakis, University of Piraeus, Greece
  • Elio Quinton, Universal Music Group, UK
  • Preeti Rao, IIT Bombay, India
  • Iris Ren, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
  • Matthias Röder, Karajan Institute, Austria
  • Jimena Royo-Letelier, Deezer, France
  • Spencer Russel, MIT Media Lab, USA
  • Justin Salamon, New York University, USA,
  • Markus Schedl, Johannes Kepler University, Austria
  • Sertan Şentürk, Freelancer, Turkey
  • Kitty Zhengshan Shi, Stanford University, USA
  • Jordan Smith, Ircam, France
  • Mohamed Sordo, Pandora, USA
  • Ajay Srinivasamurthy, Idiap Research Institute, Switzerland
  • Sebastian Stober, University of Potsdam, Germany
  • Bob Sturm, Queen Mary University of London, UK
  • Stefan Sullivan, Smule, USA
  • Mi Tian, Elsevier, UK
  • Derek Tingle, SoundCloud, Germany
  • Douglas Turnbull, Ithaca College, USA
  • George Tzanetakis, University of Victoria, Canada,
  • Rafael Valle, NVIDIA and UC Berkeley, USA
  • Makarand Velankar, MKSSS’S Cummins College of Engineering for Women, Pune, India
  • Gissel Velarde, Consultant at Sony CSL, Germany
  • Anja Volk, Utrecht University, the Netherlands
  • Thomas Walther, Spotify, UK
  • Christof Weiss, International Audio Laboratories Erlangen, Germany
  • Tillman Weyde, City University of London, UK
  • Yi-Hsuan Yang, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
  • Eva Zangerle, University of Innsbruck, Austria

Sign-ups open for WiMIR mentoring round 2018

WiMIR

For preparing the third round of the Women in Music Information Retrieval (WiMIR) mentoring program, to begin in January 2018,  we kindly invite previous and new mentors and mentees to sign up for the upcoming round through the signup forms linked below in this post.

The WiMIR mentoring program connects women students, postdocs, early-stage researchers, industry employees, and faculty to more senior women and men in MIR who are dedicated to increasing opportunities for women in the field. Mentors will share their experiences and offer guidance to support mentees in achieving and exceeding their goals and aspirations. By connecting individuals of different backgrounds and expertise, this program strengthens networks within the MIR community, both in academia and industry.

Time commitment: four remote meetings between January and end of June 2018.

Who is eligible?

– Female undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, early-stage researchers, industry employees, and faculty may sign up as mentees.

– Graduate students, industry employees, researchers, and faculty of any gender may sign up as mentors.

– Those meeting criteria for both mentor and mentee roles are welcome to sign up as both.

Faculty: Please share this announcement with female undergraduates in your departments and labs who may be interested in participating. The mentoring program can help attracting newcomers at an early stage to the MIR field.

Sign up to GET a mentor here: http://bit.ly/2AAZIqL

Sign up to BE a mentor here: http://bit.ly/2zuZp3b

Signups close Nov 30, 2017. Mentor/mentee matches will be announced in January 2018.

More information on the program:

For general information check out https://wimir.wordpress.com/mentoring-program/

Report on the mentoring round in 2017, including feedback from participants,  to be found here. Participants’ reports on their experience with the program: Stefanie Acevedo, Magdalena Fuentes, Iris Yuping Ren, Ryan Groves.

Questions? Email wimir-mentoring@ismir.net

We look forward to your response and commitment to continuing the mentoring program!

Emilia Gómez, Blair Kaneshiro, and Anja Volk (WiMIR Mentoring Program Committee)